Home Ahead of print Instructions
About us Current issue Subscribe
Editorial board Archives Contact us
Search Submit article Login 
Print this page Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 66-69

Intestinal parasitic infections among artisans in Benin city, Nigeria


1 Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria
2 Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Frederick Olusegun Akinbo
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0331-8540.122761

Rights and Permissions

Context: Human intestinal parasites have always been a major health problem in the developing countries. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among artisans and establishes a relationship between the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and risk-factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 353 participants which consisted of 272 males and 81 females were recruited for this study with age ranging from 18 to 65 years. Stool specimens were collected from the participants and analysed using the standard technique. The data obtained were analysed using Chi-square (χ2 ) to compare the frequency data while the odd ratio was calculated for potential risk factors. Results: Out of 353 subjects, 118 (33.4%) subjects had intestinal parasitic infections. Age, gender, marital status, occupation, educational status and source of food did not significantly affect (P = 0.219, P = 0.920, P = 0.276, P = 0.087, P = 0.074 and P = 0.442, respectively) the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. The use of well/rain water (odds ratio [OR] =2.721; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.452, 5.100; P = 0.002) and presence of diarrhoea (OR = 6.169; 95% CI = 3.665, 10.474; P < 0.0001) were significantly associated with intestinal parasitic infections among artisans. Defecating in nearby bushes resulted in a significantly increased prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among artisans (P < 0.0001). The intestinal parasites recovered were Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Entamoeba histolytica. A. lumbricoides had the highest prevalence (77.8%). The male gender had the highest prevalence in all the four intestinal parasites recovered in this study. Conclusion: Overall prevalence of 34.4% of intestinal parasitic infections was observed among artisans in Benin City. The source of water, type of toilet and presence of diarrhoea significantly affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among artisans. A. lumbricoides was the most prevalent parasitic agent recovered in this study.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7336    
    Printed323    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded496    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal